Tag Archives: reflections

Friday Flower

It may be snow white up here in NWT, but for that reason, I think it’s time for a Friday flower.

Lavender in the drying process.

The photo above, taken a couple of years ago, is of a bunch from one of my lavender pots. Lavender is said to bring luck. In ancient times, it was burned in bonfires to ward off evil or to entice good fortune.

Despite its reputation as an “old lady” flower, I have always loved it for its fragrance and pretty purple flowers. Dried, it can last a long time; I like to keep it in my closet to repel moths, and outside, it repels mosquitoes.

Large lavender bush.

And, as if that’s not enough, lavender scent will help you to sleep, and more deeply, as well.

It’s certainly one of nature’s beautiful presents. Do you grow lavender?

Happy Friday; happy weekend. 🙂

Frozen Falls

A photo of a partially frozen Niagara Falls, Ontario, from January, 2019.

Caymanted/Instagram (Ted E. C. Duncan)

Isn’t our natural world magnificent? It’s amazing to see that green tint in the water, and that hue certainly contributes to how cold it looks. It’s cold here in NWT, but that somehow looks colder!

After all the recent nasty weather, I hope that wherever you are, you are warm and comfortable.

Happy Wednesday. 🙂

Winter Mountains

This is a very familiar sight to me. Deep, serious winter snow. Blowing, swirling, wheeling, billowing wildly, settling uncomfortably only to be on the move again.

I find that this photo, by photographer Arthur Stanisz, captures the disquiet and restlessness of a winter storm. The mountain acts as a sort of monochromatic canvas, a supporting frame amid the curtain of darkening, louring skies.

This storm should be respected: stay inside with a good blanket and some hot chocolate.

Photo by Arthur Stanisz

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2017/04/your-shot-unbelievable-landscapes/

Happy week, everyone. 🙂

The Pandemic Wall

It really looks as if the federal government is going to tighten our pandemic travel rules, a lot. The prime minister is being pushed that way, and, I think, is leaning that way. That means no travelling at all, either nationally or internationally.

Although I’ve hit a bit of a patience wall, I’m in favour of it. I want to do what’s in the best interests of the vulnerable. And the sooner we hunker down, the more we can control this wretched virus, and together with the vaccines, that means …

One of my favourite Penticton restaurants.

… going to a restaurant! Inside!

What else?

Meeting with family and friends! And being able to hug!

This is a picture of a former Canadian politician, Tom Mulcair. That’s not the point, though: it’s a crowded room, and there’s not a mask in sight.

No masks! Hot, soggy, fogging-up-the-glasses uncomfortable. If I never have to wear a mask again, I’ll be very thankful.

I hope to say good-bye to these soon.

And lastly, but definitely not leastly, just being able to live without covid. Without worrying about loved ones, without thinking of all the safeties you have to do to go to the grocery store, … without worrying about my son, the paramedic.

I was lately reminded that nothing lasts forever, including a pandemic. So yes, this, too, shall pass.

We have to continue to be patient. And safety conscious. And thankful for essential workers of all kinds.

Sunny days will return.

It will end.

What do you look forward to the most?

Snow People

Here is an eerie but extraordinary picture from …

… photographer Pierre Destribats. It was taken in Lapland, which is a part of Finland.

The light shown in this photo is very familiar to me. It’s that top-of-the-world, angled sunlight that is passing through a clear, cold atmosphere.

I have seen these formations here in Northwest Territories, but only occasionally and the result is much less impressive. What are they, you ask? These are actually snow-covered trees.

An icy coating forms over the trees when humidity in the air makes contact with the branches. The moisture freezes instantly and begins to form a layer of thick frosting. This results in these rather ghostly, human-like sculptures.

An alien landscape on Earth.

This photo was originally published in National Geographic magazine.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2017/04/your-shot-unbelievable-landscapes/

Happy weekend, everyone. 🙂

Help Clear the Way — PhotoBlography3

NOTE: This post contains slideshows and if you are reading it on your phone, it may be best viewed direct from the SITE, rather than in the READER. The world is kind of a hard scrabble free-for-all right now, as greed and the lust for power seem to be clouding the judgement of many, often […]

Help Clear the Way — PhotoBlography3

My blog-friend Allan, who lives just outside of Edmonton, Alberta, makes some very simple, but very effective points in his photo-post, “Help Clear the Way.” Please click on the link to read the full piece.

Some Favourite Landscapes

Getting out right now …

near Red Earth, Northern Alberta

… isn’t much of an option, so here are some of my favourite views.

Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

The warmth and soft air of Dominican Republic,

Tofino, British Columbia

and the tang of Tofino’s salty Pacific song are remembrances of lovely past travels.

Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories

And right next to where I work, a tranquil autumn view of Great Slave Lake.

Penticton, British Columbia

Home. ❤️

Happy week. May good memories sustain you and keep you.

The Bridge

Deh Cho/Mackenzie River Bridge

The Deh Cho Bridge is a one km-long cable-stayed bridge across a 1.6 km span of the Mackenzie River on the Yellowknife Highway near Fort Providence, Northwest Territories.

I’ve crossed many bridges, both physical and figurative. Some have been “cable-stayed” and others have been ready to fall into an immense crevasse.

The figurative bridges have sometimes been the very worst and I would have given anything to have had decking under my feet.

How about you?