Tag Archives: climate

Bee Thistle

I found this worker bee very busily nectar-sipping and pollen gathering in this giant thistle flower.

No time for a break! Too much to do!

The bees collect nectar to feed to the young ones back at the hive.

The little ones are going to love this!

Bees eat pollen, but they also spread it from plant to plant, and as a result are massively key to a healthy ecosystem.

Just let me get this last bit …

Without them our world would be in serious trouble. Such lovely, tiny insects are so incredibly important to all living beings.

Dear Deer

This little deer stopped by our place for a snack.

Does this one taste good?

She looked a little skinny and bedraggled and her face seemed a bit injured. I wondered if she had escaped our huge, nearby fire.

Maybe I’ll try this one.

She didn’t seem upset or perturbed, though.

No, I like the first one better.

There has been an uptick in the number of deer and other animals (apparently, bears as well) we are seeing in the city, probably because of the fires. They are finding refuge wherever they can, but it’s terrible to realise there are many animals who haven’t escaped or are badly injured.

I’ve been thinking about them a lot.

Hazy Okanagan Lake

After our time under the “heat dome” where our temperatures reached into the mid-to-high C40s, we have finally cooled down to the more usual, which is about low-to-mid 30s for this time of year.

After all that extreme heat and only very minimal precipitation, moisture conditions are dire and fires are developing everywhere. Currently, there are 180 fires in British Columbia, 12 of which are a potential threat to safety. Additionally, the smoke and heat from these fires are combining to create a separate weather system that has lead to huge vertical smoke clouds with their own lightening bolts and fire tornadoes.

A smoke-hazy Okanagan Lake from Saturday.

One fire has already consumed the majority of a small town, Lytton, which became famous for breaking temperature records in Canada for three days in a row. Before 90% of it was destroyed late last week by a swiftly-moving fire, it recorded a temperature of 49.5°C (121°F).

There are no fires in our immediate vicinity, but there is smoke.

Clear views from a nearby location a year ago.

I hope that we get some rain soon and the firefighters are able to get these fires under control, but this will likely be just a temporary fix. Climate scientists have indicated that we should start expecting much more of this in the seasons to come.