Tag Archives: birds

Comedy Wildlife Awards: It’s Smile Time

Here’s a great photo from 2019. Entitled “He’s right behind me, isn’t he?” it was taken by Anthony N Petrovitch.

Swim faster!

And I love this photo from Vlado Pirsa called “Family Disagreement.”

Stop ignoring me!

We can all imagine that conversation.

And this head scratcher from Co Grift.

Darling, you’re looking a bit orange today. Was it something I said?

The original website is here: https://www.comedywildlifephoto.com/gallery/finalists/2019_finalists.php

Although these photos are humorous, they are also meant to bring attention to wildlife and their habitat destruction.

Happy mid-week. 🙂

2020 Photographic Review, Part 1

In spite of the fact that 2020 wasn’t much liked, I was able to take a few decent photos. Some were more popular than others, and here are some of those, again. I didn’t necessarily take these photos in this order or during those months; they just match better. 🙂

Here are the first six of your 2020 favourites.

January

Into the light.

February

University of Toronto heritage building.

March

Toronto’s CN Tower and a super-moon.

April

How can you not adore me?

May

Apart together.

June

Orchid glory.

Happy Monday; happy week. 🙂

Watching You Watching Them

Alex Badyaev Wildlife Photographer of the Year https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2020/10/winners-wildlife-photographer-year-2020/616710/

Entitled Watching You Watching Them, this photographer was gifted with an example of the bird he was studying right outside his cabin window.

The Cordilleran flycatcher is declining across western North America as the changing climate causes shrinkage of the riparian habitats (i.e. river and other freshwater corridors) along its migratory routes and on its wintering grounds in Mexico. In Montana’s Rocky Mountain Front, it typically nests in crevices and on canyon shelves. But one pair picked this remote research cabin instead, perhaps to avoid predation. The nest was built on the head of a window frame by the female. Both parents were feeding the nestlings, flying out to snatch insects in mid-air or hovering to pick them off leaves.

So as not to disturb the birds or attract predators to the nest, Alex Badyaev hid his camera behind a large piece of bark on an ancient spruce tree leaning against the cabin. He directed a flash toward the trunk, so the scene would be illuminated by reflection, and operated the setup remotely from the cabin. He captured his shot as the female paused to check on her four nestlings. Behind her—the cabin serving as a conveniently spacious blind—the biologist recorded his observations.

Happy Friday, everyone. 🙂

Truck Ptarmigan

This poor little guy was wind-blown into the house a couple of evenings ago.

He seemed to bounce and then landed on the roof of my truck. He initially didn’t look very well but was moving about.

I kept an eye on him and about 20 minutes later, he flew away. I was quite concerned about him because ravens would consider him to be a tasty snack. They are huge, aggressive, and smart.

Happily, he was able to recover before the ravens realised he was there.

A win for the ptarmigans. Maybe, a covid-mitigating win for all of us is coming soon.

Happy week. 🙂