Tag Archives: Animals

Photo: The Great Swim

I found the following photo in a piece from Live Science (https://www.livescience.com/) and couldn’t resist sharing it. Below I have excerpted the article about the photo.

‘A stunning photo captures a group of cheetahs, the world’s fastest land sprinters, struggling to swim through a raging river in Kenya.

The group of male cheetahs was fording the Talek River in the Maasai Mara National Reserve in an effort to access better hunting grounds. The striking photo is one of the highly commended entries in the 2021 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

Buddhilini de Soyza, an investment banker and amateur photographer, took the photo on a trip to Kenya in January 2020 while with her husband and a Maasai guide, after spending several hours watching the cheetahs pace up and down the river bank. Suddenly, the lead cheetah jumped into the water, and the rest followed.

“I just couldn’t believe my eyes,” de Soyza told Live Science. “I don’t actually remember clicking [the photo]. I obviously did because I’ve got a good 50, 60 shots of them crossing. All I do remember shouting is, ‘Oh my god what are they going to do? They’re going to die!”

Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) are strong swimmers, but like many cats can be hesitant around water. The river in the photo was rough following heavy rain and flooding, but the cheetahs needed to cross it to reach the larger side of their territory, which had more prey, according to de Soyza. She took the photo as the cheetahs hit the most turbulent part of the river. 

“I feel like the lead cheetah is talking to me,” de Soyza said of the photo. “He’s looking straight at me, so it almost feels like he’s just saying, ‘Put down that camera and help me.'” The river’s current dragged the cheetahs about 330 feet (100 meters) downstream, but they successfully made it across.’

What a wonderful capture!

STAND UP

I ran into a friend who drives Bear Watching boats the other day. He was in a hurry as he had a boat load waiting for him so I couldn’t chat too much…

STAND UP

An alarming post from Wayne at Tofino Photography. The bears around his area of Vancouver Island aren’t getting enough to eat and as a result are not giving birth to any cubs. Please stop by his blog to read about his concerns.

Dear Deer

This little deer stopped by our place for a snack.

Does this one taste good?

She looked a little skinny and bedraggled and her face seemed a bit injured. I wondered if she had escaped our huge, nearby fire.

Maybe I’ll try this one.

She didn’t seem upset or perturbed, though.

No, I like the first one better.

There has been an uptick in the number of deer and other animals (apparently, bears as well) we are seeing in the city, probably because of the fires. They are finding refuge wherever they can, but it’s terrible to realise there are many animals who haven’t escaped or are badly injured.

I’ve been thinking about them a lot.

The Deer and the Apricot Tree

I came across this deer chowing down on apricots. There were three trees in the field, all of which have very ripe and seemingly abandoned fruit. He didn’t seem much bothered by me as I stopped to admire the scene.

There were many apricots on the ground but this guy was picking them right from the trees.

I’m glad he found the trees and is having some good meals – he was there again the next day – it would be a shame for the fruit to go to waste.

Happy Monday; happy week. 🙂

The Road Home

On June 24, M and I left the Northwest Territories to head to British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley.

Here are a few photos from our drive west through the mountains. They aren’t terrific because I took them from a moving vehicle through the dirtiest windshield ever!

Mountain view.
Getting closer.
Young mountain sheep in Jasper National Park.
Here, they have the right of way.

We are home now, starting to relax into holiday mode after an extremely busy covid-related 15 months. It’s really hot (low 40s C) but I’m happy with that. The covid cases are continuing to drop, and I hope that we have seen the last wave.