Category Archives: Photography

Spring Is on Its Way


It’s still January but about two weeks ago, the weather turned. The temperature crept up, the bit of snow we had started to melt, and the ducks started squawking and flapping. Every day now it’s a little warmer and a little sunnier.

This morning I was out walking and took this photo of Skaha Lake. I’m lucky enough to live across from it and have been watching its moody winter changes this year.

It’s still got some ice over the shallows near the shore, but I don’t think that will last long.

 

Skaha Lake is melting.
Skaha Lake is melting.

Spring is coming. ๐Ÿ™‚

More Autumn Views

As the Okanagan descends gently into winter, here are a few more views.

On a recent sunny day, M. and I went up to Chute Lake. It almost felt like spring except for that sharp autumn-air quality.

Water-laden clouds arise more suddenly at this time of year.
Water-laden clouds arise more suddenly at this time of year.

While hiking along a back trail, M. and I found this sign.

The sign says, "See the Ponderosa Pine - 4.5 m Circumference."
The sign says, “See the Ponderosa Pine – 4.5 m Circumference.”

If you’re metrically challenged, 4.5 metres is 14.76 feet.

This is a very big tree.
This is ย one big tree.

Here’s another view. I had to strain my neck to get this tree in the frame.

There's a formula for figuring out the age of a pine. This one's about the same age as the U.S.
There’s a formula for figuring out the age of a pine. This one’s about the same age as the U.S.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said, “We are all poets when we are in the pine woods.” There are lots of pine forests in this area.

A couple of days ago, M. and I went to the small mountain town of Rossland, BC. It has produced four Olympian skiers including Nancy Green; two NHL hockey players and a prime minister, John Turner. Pretty good for a town of 4000.

A shrouded valley.
Rossland is under all that mist.

And finally, another yellow tree.

Beautiful.
Beautiful.

I’ve really been enjoying this autumnal bounty. ๐Ÿ™‚

What’s fall like where you live?

A Tamarack Forest in Autumn

Yesterday, M and I went for a hike in Okanagan Mountain Provincial Park. It had rained earlier in the day, but when we got started at about one pm, it was bright and sunny with that sharp clarity of fall light.

Inside a big yellow.
Inside a big yellow.

We hadn’t hiked here before and found ourselves in the midst of a spectacularly yellow aspen forest.

Tree Gold.
Tree Gold.

This forest is recovering from a large, ravaging fire that occurred in 2003. It’s amazing to see some surviving giants, seriously scorched at their bases, but still growing.

The new, the old, and the survivors.
The present, the past, and the survivors.

We climbed through the forest and up to a lookout over Lake Okanagan.

What a view!
What a view!

We finished out the day with a drive along an old railway track. This afforded us some impressive views; we were stopping every 10 metres!

 

The city of Kelowna is in the distance.
The city of Kelowna is in the distance.

The old railway tracks have been removed and the remaining trail is used for hiking, biking, or creeping along in a truck, as we did.

Forest that escaped the fire.
Forest that escaped the fire.

M and I have experienced some additional life stuff lately and so a day like yesterday was truly fabulous!

I’ll be coming by to catch up with all of you. ๐Ÿ™‚

Okanagan Spring

Apparently, spring has been early, and I’ve been enjoying every minute of it, even when the temperature went up to 30C for a couple of days. It’s more seasonal now, but those warm days ensured that blooms are everywhere, that the hills are verdant, and that lushness prevails. The wine is growing! ๐Ÿ™‚

It's green!
It’s green! (And blue!)
More green!
More green! (And blue!) The snow on those far hills has been gone for a couple of weeks now.
And yellow. These beautiful daisy-like wild- flowers are everywhere.
And yellow. These beautiful daisy-like wildflowers are everywhere.
IMG_20160410_133008
This very popular trail is on the site of an old railroad track. It’s a favourite walk of M’s and mine.
A final view ... for now.
A final view … for now.

๐Ÿ™‚

How is your spring going?

Iconic Vancouver Island Scenes

The Pacific Ocean
The Pacific Ocean at Otter Point

A trip to Vancouver Island wouldn’t be complete without a couple of shots of its iconic coastline. These enormous logs (above) washed up during the terrific surfs that can occur during winter storms. The logs themselves probably escaped from logging pens or “booms.”

The surf and the rain are doing their jobs.
The surf and the rain are doing their jobs on this old log.

The weather was a comfortable 10C with rain showers and a few sunny periods. The rain was a strong reminder of the fact that Vancouver Island is home to ancient “old growth” rain forest. First Nations peoples and many others have worked hard to save these forests from logging companies. Typically, the forests grow right up to the edge of the ocean.

An old stump imbedded in the gravel beach.
An old stump imbedded in the gravel beach.

This stump has likely been there for a long time; people have carved their names and initials into its deteriorating surface. I can’t help but wonder if this stump is what was left after the tree was cut down for lumber.

Another view of "this old log."
Another view of this beautiful remnant.

The tree itself must have been very old and very magnificient before it died and its remains were washed into the sea. I couldn’t count the rings because of the surf and also because of how worn it is, but I could see many of them, perhaps a hundred. It’s still magnificient, still standing up to the elements that will eventually take it completely.